10 Ways to Rock Minty Hues in Your Home

10 Ways to Rock Minty Hues in Your Home

A touch of this light green can freshen up any room or style.

Houzz Contributor, Laura Gaskill

If pre-remodel bathroom tiles are what immediately come to mind when you think of mint green, think again. There’s a lot more to this hue than retro appliances and vintage bathrooms. From bungalow charm to midcentury cool (and beyond), mint is a design chameleon that can work just about anywhere.

1. Mint looks cheerful on cottages and bungalows. Mint makes a cheery first impression when paired with earthy siding or natural shingles on a craftsman bungalow or cottage. Repainting your house not on your to-do list? Give your bungalow a curb appeal boost with a mint green mailbox and copper house numbers that will develop a natural verdigris patina over time.

2. Mint makes a refreshing change of pace from all white. All-white kitchens have been the star of the show for years. If you (and your kitchen) are ready for a change of pace, why not try mint green? On walls, cupboards or both, soft mint green brings a hint of vintage nostalgia, yet plays well alongside more contemporary features like stone counters and sculptural wood stools.

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3. Mint lightens up a room full of antiques. Have a full-blown antiques obsession? Show off your treasures while steering clear of the musty antiques-store vibe by painting the walls fresh mint green. The light walls offset dark wood and lacquered pieces beautifully.

See more of this home

4. Mint and midcentury style are a match made in heaven. Since mint was a popular color in design from the late 1930s through the early 1960s, it makes sense that it looks right at home alongside furniture and decor that reference that era. Pair up midcentury-style furniture (like the credenza shown here) and eclectic art with mint walls for a happy, modern look.

5. Mint can be elegant. Paired with chinoiserie panels, gourd lamps and neatly tailored linens, mint brings a bit of cool, Grace Kelly glamour to your space, especially when used in a luxe fabric like velvet or silk.

6. Chalky mint makes a great furniture paint color. If farm-fresh eggs, fabulous quilts and ironstone pottery are what make your heart go pitter-pat, the natural matte look of milk paint and chalk paint are probably right up your alley. Update a thrift store furniture find or pick up a new piece in unfinished wood and give it a coat of mint green milk or chalk paint.

7. Mint works equally well for boys and girls. If you’re planning a room for siblings to share or your child just isn’t a fan of pink or blue, consider mint, the modern alternative to gender-neutral yellow. It’s fresh, hip and especially current when you paint just half the wall a minty hue.

How to Get a Half-Painted Wall Just Right

8. A hint of mint goes a long way. Whether you add mint green barn lights or a collection of jadeite kitchenware, a few mint accessories are all you need to elevate a basic all-white design.

9. Mint is beachy without being blue. Love the easy breeziness of beach style but don’t love true blue? Choose a softer shade of sea-glass-inspired green rather than the more common navy or turquoise.

10. Mint is timeless. With a rich history in design (you can find beautiful shades of mint among historical paint color palettes) and its ability to work anywhere from a traditional farmhouse to an urban loft, mint green may be trending, but it’s also here to stay.

Tell us: Are you a fan of mint green? Share your thoughts and photos in the Comments.

More
Bathed in Color: When to Use Green in the Bath
Seeing Green: Some Kitchens Ditch White for Mother Nature’s Neutral

Related Reads
Siding Companies That Will Help You Pair Mint With Earthy Shingles
Match Mint With Midcentury Modern Style
Is a Craftsman House Right for You?

 

 

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