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Fierce Competition in SouthPuget Sound Real Estate Values

Feb 27, 2018


Local Real Estate,Real Estate Broker, Selling,Real Estate Data Analysis, Real Estate Market
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These days, you can’t seem to go anywhere without someone talking about real estate values. A common discussion of how much value a homeowner’s house has gained can be heard at most any get together or neighborhood Starbucks. With the press constantly writing about the real estate market, these discussions can be quite competitive.

Depending on where you live in Pierce County, last year, your value may have increased. The median home value in Pierce County is $318,700. Pierce County home values have gone up 10.9% over the past year and Zillow predicts they will rise 4.4% within the next year.

The median list price per square foot in Pierce County is $182. While someone living in Tacoma and surrounding areas  has seen some of the largest gains in the country, the rest of Pierce County has also benefited from our region’s demand. But how has the rest of Pierce County increased compared to Seattle, and is the big city really the big winner in this value battle?

 

I know what you’re thinking. What happens next? Good question. While I don’t have my crystal ball in front of me, for Pierce County, much of the same is expected. Limited inventory and demand will continue to propel prices up with inventory continuing to be at the lowest of lows. There is the prospect for what will happen with rising interest rates. Well, we’ll see and that will have to wait for my next blog post.

 

lesliesellshouses.com/real-estate/home-buyers/down-payment-help Click on link below 

Leslie Sells Houses

 

Daylight Savings Is the Perfect Time For House Maintenance

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It’s almost time to move the clocks ahead an hour. But that’s not the only thing you should be doing on March 11, 2018.

Tasks to tackle every daylight savings time change
Daylight savings time rolls around twice a year for most of the country, and while it may moderately disrupt your sleep schedule for a few days, the event is an excellent reminder to tackle those infrequent chores. Even if you own a piece of Phoenix, AZ, real estate (where the daylight savings time change doesn’t exist), the days are slowly getting longer from now until the summer solstice, leaving you plenty of time to check off a few extra tasks.

Daylight Savings is a great time to…

  1. Clean your windows. It’s an arduous chore that, thankfully, needs to be done only periodically. “Unless you have pets or small children who leave smudges, you may not need to clean the inside of the window,” says Donna Smallin Kuper, a certified housecleaning technician and small-space expert. (Pro tip: You can hire someone to do this for you for around $100.)
  2. Rid yourself of dust bunnies. Roll up your area rugs and vacuum underneath them. Pull out your stove and refrigerator and do the same. It’s also a good idea to gently vacuum your refrigerator coils, which will keep the fridge running properly. Be sure to unplug the fridge before doing this, and consult your user manual to find the location of the coils.
  3. Fix up your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The daylight savings time change is a good reminder to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. But while you’re at it, remove and wipe the detector cover with a damp cloth, then vacuum the interior to remove any dust particles, says Smallin Kuper. Check your dryer vents too, to make sure they are lint-free.
  4. Swap out your winter bedding. Remove your winter quilts and sheets and replace them with lighter-weight bedding. “Always launder these items before storing,” advises Smallin Kuper, adding that it helps keep moths at bay.
  5. Do a big dust. Working from high to low, start by wiping down ceiling fans and the tops of bookcases and other furniture with a duster that has an extending pole. Gently clean the inside of light fixtures and wipe down (cool) light bulbs to remove grime. Finally, dust baseboards and windowsills with a slightly damp microfiber cloth.
  6. Deep-clean carpets and rugs. If you haven’t done this before, it’s a sound idea to start now. “Many carpet manufacturers will void the warranty on carpets if they’re not professionally cleaned at least once every 12 to 18 months,” says Smallin Kuper.
  7. Get rid of stuff. Start with the obvious places, like your closet or junk drawer, but don’t skip the often-forgotten ones, like your bathroom and pantry. Go through your medicine cabinet and toss expired medications. Open up your cosmetic bag (or drawer) and throw out anything that looks a little grungy, and if you haven’t changed your toothbrush in a few months, swap it out for a new one. Toss anything in your pantry that’s expired and give your utensil drawer a once-over — are the knives too worn or in need of a little sharpening? Is there anything there that should be tossed?
  8. Deep-clean your kitchen appliances. Wipe down the door of your stove, dishwasher, and fridge with warm, soapy water. Turn on the self-clean cycle in your oven and then tackle the inside of your dishwasher with a toothbrush and hot, soapy water, making sure to clean the rubber seal inside the door. Wipe away any debris with a leftover sponge, put a cup full of white vinegar on the top rack, and run a full cycle. When the cycle is done, wipe the inside of the dishwasher with a soft cloth.

Originally published March 8, 2016. Updated February 15, 2018.

Leslie Sells Houses

What other cleaning practices do you make time for after the daylight savings time change? Let us know in the comments below!

 

It’s almost time to move the clocks ahead an hour. But that’s not the only thing you should be doing on March 11, 2018.

Tasks to tackle every daylight savings time change
Daylight savings time rolls around twice a year for most of the country, and while it may moderately disrupt your sleep schedule for a few days, the event is an excellent reminder to tackle those infrequent chores. Even if you own a piece of Phoenix, AZ, real estate (where the daylight savings time change doesn’t exist), the days are slowly getting longer from now until the summer solstice, leaving you plenty of time to check off a few extra tasks.

Daylight Savings is a great time to…

  1. Clean your windows. It’s an arduous chore that, thankfully, needs to be done only periodically. “Unless you have pets or small children who leave smudges, you may not need to clean the inside of the window,” says Donna Smallin Kuper, a certified housecleaning technician and small-space expert. (Pro tip: You can hire someone to do this for you for around $100.)
  2. Rid yourself of dust bunnies. Roll up your area rugs and vacuum underneath them. Pull out your stove and refrigerator and do the same. It’s also a good idea to gently vacuum your refrigerator coils, which will keep the fridge running properly. Be sure to unplug the fridge before doing this, and consult your user manual to find the location of the coils.
  3. Fix up your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The daylight savings time change is a good reminder to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. But while you’re at it, remove and wipe the detector cover with a damp cloth, then vacuum the interior to remove any dust particles, says Smallin Kuper. Check your dryer vents too, to make sure they are lint-free.
  4. Swap out your winter bedding. Remove your winter quilts and sheets and replace them with lighter-weight bedding. “Always launder these items before storing,” advises Smallin Kuper, adding that it helps keep moths at bay.
  5. Do a big dust. Working from high to low, start by wiping down ceiling fans and the tops of bookcases and other furniture with a duster that has an extending pole. Gently clean the inside of light fixtures and wipe down (cool) light bulbs to remove grime. Finally, dust baseboards and windowsills with a slightly damp microfiber cloth.
  6. Deep-clean carpets and rugs. If you haven’t done this before, it’s a sound idea to start now. “Many carpet manufacturers will void the warranty on carpets if they’re not professionally cleaned at least once every 12 to 18 months,” says Smallin Kuper.
  7. Get rid of stuff. Start with the obvious places, like your closet or junk drawer, but don’t skip the often-forgotten ones, like your bathroom and pantry. Go through your medicine cabinet and toss expired medications. Open up your cosmetic bag (or drawer) and throw out anything that looks a little grungy, and if you haven’t changed your toothbrush in a few months, swap it out for a new one. Toss anything in your pantry that’s expired and give your utensil drawer a once-over — are the knives too worn or in need of a little sharpening? Is there anything there that should be tossed?
  8. Deep-clean your kitchen appliances. Wipe down the door of your stove, dishwasher, and fridge with warm, soapy water. Turn on the self-clean cycle in your oven and then tackle the inside of your dishwasher with a toothbrush and hot, soapy water, making sure to clean the rubber seal inside the door. Wipe away any debris with a leftover sponge, put a cup full of white vinegar on the top rack, and run a full cycle. When the cycle is done, wipe the inside of the dishwasher with a soft cloth.

Originally published March 8, 2016. Updated February 15, 2018.

What other cleaning practices do you make time for after the daylight savings time change? Let us know in the comments below!

 

 

It’s almost time to move the clocks ahead an hour. But that’s not the only thing you should be doing on March 11, 2018.

Tasks to tackle every daylight savings time change
Daylight savings time rolls around twice a year for most of the country, and while it may moderately disrupt your sleep schedule for a few days, the event is an excellent reminder to tackle those infrequent chores. Even if you own a piece of Phoenix, AZ, real estate (where the daylight savings time change doesn’t exist), the days are slowly getting longer from now until the summer solstice, leaving you plenty of time to check off a few extra tasks.

Daylight Savings is a great time to…

  1. Clean your windows. It’s an arduous chore that, thankfully, needs to be done only periodically. “Unless you have pets or small children who leave smudges, you may not need to clean the inside of the window,” says Donna Smallin Kuper, a certified housecleaning technician and small-space expert. (Pro tip: You can hire someone to do this for you for around $100.)
  2. Rid yourself of dust bunnies. Roll up your area rugs and vacuum underneath them. Pull out your stove and refrigerator and do the same. It’s also a good idea to gently vacuum your refrigerator coils, which will keep the fridge running properly. Be sure to unplug the fridge before doing this, and consult your user manual to find the location of the coils.
  3. Fix up your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The daylight savings time change is a good reminder to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. But while you’re at it, remove and wipe the detector cover with a damp cloth, then vacuum the interior to remove any dust particles, says Smallin Kuper. Check your dryer vents too, to make sure they are lint-free.
  4. Swap out your winter bedding. Remove your winter quilts and sheets and replace them with lighter-weight bedding. “Always launder these items before storing,” advises Smallin Kuper, adding that it helps keep moths at bay.
  5. Do a big dust. Working from high to low, start by wiping down ceiling fans and the tops of bookcases and other furniture with a duster that has an extending pole. Gently clean the inside of light fixtures and wipe down (cool) light bulbs to remove grime. Finally, dust baseboards and windowsills with a slightly damp microfiber cloth.
  6. Deep-clean carpets and rugs. If you haven’t done this before, it’s a sound idea to start now. “Many carpet manufacturers will void the warranty on carpets if they’re not professionally cleaned at least once every 12 to 18 months,” says Smallin Kuper.
  7. Get rid of stuff. Start with the obvious places, like your closet or junk drawer, but don’t skip the often-forgotten ones, like your bathroom and pantry. Go through your medicine cabinet and toss expired medications. Open up your cosmetic bag (or drawer) and throw out anything that looks a little grungy, and if you haven’t changed your toothbrush in a few months, swap it out for a new one. Toss anything in your pantry that’s expired and give your utensil drawer a once-over — are the knives too worn or in need of a little sharpening? Is there anything there that should be tossed?
  8. Deep-clean your kitchen appliances. Wipe down the door of your stove, dishwasher, and fridge with warm, soapy water. Turn on the self-clean cycle in your oven and then tackle the inside of your dishwasher with a toothbrush and hot, soapy water, making sure to clean the rubber seal inside the door. Wipe away any debris with a leftover sponge, put a cup full of white vinegar on the top rack, and run a full cycle. When the cycle is done, wipe the inside of the dishwasher with a soft cloth.

Originally published March 8, 2016. Updated February 15, 2018.

What other cleaning practices do you make time for after the daylight savings time change? Let us know in the comments below!

 

Daylight Savings Is the Perfect Time For House Maintenance By Michelle Hainer | Feb 15, 2018 5:03PM It’s almost time to move the clocks ahead an hour. But that’s not the only thing you should be doing on March 11, 2018. Daylight savings time rolls around twice a year for most of the country, and while it may moderately disrupt your sleep schedule for a few days, the event is an excellent reminder to tackle those infrequent chores. Even if you own a piece of Phoenix, AZ, real estate (where the daylight savings time change doesn’t exist), the days are slowly getting longer from now until the summer solstice, leaving you plenty of time to check off a few extra tasks. Daylight Savings is a great time to… Clean your windows. It’s an arduous chore that, thankfully, needs to be done only periodically. “Unless you have pets or small children who leave smudges, you may not need to clean the inside of the window,” says Donna Smallin Kuper, a certified housecleaning technician and small-space expert. (Pro tip: You can hire someone to do this for you for around $100.) Rid yourself of dust bunnies. Roll up your area rugs and vacuum underneath them. Pull out your stove and refrigerator and do the same. It’s also a good idea to gently vacuum your refrigerator coils, which will keep the fridge running properly. Be sure to unplug the fridge before doing this, and consult your user manual to find the location of the coils. Fix up your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The daylight savings time change is a good reminder to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. But while you’re at it, remove and wipe the detector cover with a damp cloth, then vacuum the interior to remove any dust particles, says Smallin Kuper. Check your dryer vents too, to make sure they are lint-free. Swap out your winter bedding. Remove your winter quilts and sheets and replace them with lighter-weight bedding. “Always launder these items before storing,” advises Smallin Kuper, adding that it helps keep moths at bay. Do a big dust. Working from high to low, start by wiping down ceiling fans and the tops of bookcases and other furniture with a duster that has an extending pole. Gently clean the inside of light fixtures and wipe down (cool) light bulbs to remove grime. Finally, dust baseboards and windowsills with a slightly damp microfiber cloth. Deep-clean carpets and rugs. If you haven’t done this before, it’s a sound idea to start now. “Many carpet manufacturers will void the warranty on carpets if they’re not professionally cleaned at least once every 12 to 18 months,” says Smallin Kuper. Get rid of stuff. Start with the obvious places, like your closet or junk drawer, but don’t skip the often-forgotten ones, like your bathroom and pantry. Go through your medicine cabinet and toss expired medications. Open up your cosmetic bag (or drawer) and throw out anything that looks a little grungy, and if you haven’t changed your toothbrush in a few months, swap it out for a new one. Toss anything in your pantry that’s expired and give your utensil drawer a once-over — are the knives too worn or in need of a little sharpening? Is there anything there that should be tossed? Deep-clean your kitchen appliances. Wipe down the door of your stove, dishwasher, and fridge with warm, soapy water. Turn on the self-clean cycle in your oven and then tackle the inside of your dishwasher with a toothbrush and hot, soapy water, making sure to clean the rubber seal inside the door. Wipe away any debris with a leftover sponge, put a cup full of white vinegar on the top rack, and run a full cycle. When the cycle is done, wipe the inside of the dishwasher with a soft cloth. Originally published March 8, 2016. Updated February 15, 2018. What other cleaning practices do you make time for after the daylight savings time change? Let us know in the comments below! We can help with your home search. Receive weekly news, advice, listings, and neighborhood info by email. Sign Me Up Want to Share a Comment? (4) Michelle Hainer Michelle Hainer is a freelance writer, editor, and blogger whose work has appeared in Country Living, InStyle, People, Teen People, and The Washington Post. Read about her family’s adventures in eating locally and seasonally on her blog, Made By Michelle. DIY MORE ABOUT: Decluttering, DIY, Organizing Related articles and tips VIDEO: No Chimney? No Problem! Read More 13 Awesomely Festive Hacks for the Perfect Holiday Bash Read More Tour a Texas Home Straight Out of a Dystopian Novel Read More

Buy Rent Mortgage Sell More Home Real Estate 101 The Neighborhood Money Matters Life at Home Celebrity Research Tech & Innovation TRULIA’S BLOG \ DIY Daylight Savings Is the Perfect Time For House Maintenance By Michelle Hainer | Feb 15, 2018 5:03PM It’s almost time to move the clocks ahead an hour. But that’s not the only thing you should be doing on March 11, 2018. Daylight savings time rolls around twice a year for most of the country, and while it may moderately disrupt your sleep schedule for a few days, the event is an excellent reminder to tackle those infrequent chores. Even if you own a piece of Phoenix, AZ, real estate (where the daylight savings time change doesn’t exist), the days are slowly getting longer from now until the summer solstice, leaving you plenty of time to check off a few extra tasks. Daylight Savings is a great time to… Clean your windows. It’s an arduous chore that, thankfully, needs to be done only periodically. “Unless you have pets or small children who leave smudges, you may not need to clean the inside of the window,” says Donna Smallin Kuper, a certified housecleaning technician and small-space expert. (Pro tip: You can hire someone to do this for you for around $100.) Rid yourself of dust bunnies. Roll up your area rugs and vacuum underneath them. Pull out your stove and refrigerator and do the same. It’s also a good idea to gently vacuum your refrigerator coils, which will keep the fridge running properly. Be sure to unplug the fridge before doing this, and consult your user manual to find the location of the coils. Fix up your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The daylight savings time change is a good reminder to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. But while you’re at it, remove and wipe the detector cover with a damp cloth, then vacuum the interior to remove any dust particles, says Smallin Kuper. Check your dryer vents too, to make sure they are lint-free. Swap out your winter bedding. Remove your winter quilts and sheets and replace them with lighter-weight bedding. “Always launder these items before storing,” advises Smallin Kuper, adding that it helps keep moths at bay. Do a big dust. Working from high to low, start by wiping down ceiling fans and the tops of bookcases and other furniture with a duster that has an extending pole. Gently clean the inside of light fixtures and wipe down (cool) light bulbs to remove grime. Finally, dust baseboards and windowsills with a slightly damp microfiber cloth. Deep-clean carpets and rugs. If you haven’t done this before, it’s a sound idea to start now. “Many carpet manufacturers will void the warranty on carpets if they’re not professionally cleaned at least once every 12 to 18 months,” says Smallin Kuper. Get rid of stuff. Start with the obvious places, like your closet or junk drawer, but don’t skip the often-forgotten ones, like your bathroom and pantry. Go through your medicine cabinet and toss expired medications. Open up your cosmetic bag (or drawer) and throw out anything that looks a little grungy, and if you haven’t changed your toothbrush in a few months, swap it out for a new one. Toss anything in your pantry that’s expired and give your utensil drawer a once-over — are the knives too worn or in need of a little sharpening? Is there anything there that should be tossed? Deep-clean your kitchen appliances. Wipe down the door of your stove, dishwasher, and fridge with warm, soapy water. Turn on the self-clean cycle in your oven and then tackle the inside of your dishwasher with a toothbrush and hot, soapy water, making sure to clean the rubber seal inside the door. Wipe away any debris with a leftover sponge, put a cup full of white vinegar on the top rack, and run a full cycle. When the cycle is done, wipe the inside of the dishwasher with a soft cloth. Originally published March 8, 2016. Updated February 15, 2018. What other cleaning practices do you make time for after the daylight savings time change? Let us know in the comments below! We can help with your home search. Receive weekly news, advice, listings, and neighborhood info by email. Sign Me Up Want to Share a Comment? (4) Michelle Hainer Michelle Hainer is a freelance writer, editor, and blogger whose work has appeared in Country Living, InStyle, People, Teen People, and The Washington Post. Read about her family’s adventures in eating locally and seasonally on her blog, Made By Michelle. DIY MORE ABOUT: Decluttering, DIY, Organizing Related articles and tips VIDEO: No Chimney? No Problem! Read More 13 Awesomely Festive Hacks for the Perfect Holiday Bash Read More Tour a Texas Home Straight Out of a Dystopian Novel Read More The No-Cost, Totally Free Home Makeover Read More Share your comments Real Estate 101 Buying Selling Renting House Hunting Money Matters Financial Tips Mortgages & Loans Taxes Life at Home Remodel & Renovate Moving Design & Decorate Eye Candy DIY Celebrity Actors & Actresses Musicians Athletes Exec Crowd Find Homes on the Go Learn More Trulia’s top-rated mobile app shows homes for sale near you—anytime, anywhere. About Trulia About Zillow Group Careers Investor Relations Advertising Terms Privacy Terms of Use Listing Quality Policy Subscription Terms Ad Choices Copyright © 2017 Trulia, Inc. All rights reserved. Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity. Have a Question? Visit our Help Center to find the answer. Buy Rent Mortgage Sell More Home Real Estate 101 The Neighborhood Money Matters Life at Home Celebrity Research Tech & Innovation TRULIA’S BLOG \ DIY Daylight Savings Is the Perfect Time For House Maintenance By Michelle Hainer | Feb 15, 2018 5:03PM It’s almost time to move the clocks ahead an hour. But that’s not the only thing you should be doing on March 11, 2018. Daylight savings time rolls around twice a year for most of the country, and while it may moderately disrupt your sleep schedule for a few days, the event is an excellent reminder to tackle those infrequent chores. Even if you own a piece of Phoenix, AZ, real estate (where the daylight savings time change doesn’t exist), the days are slowly getting longer from now until the summer solstice, leaving you plenty of time to check off a few extra tasks. Daylight Savings is a great time to… Clean your windows. It’s an arduous chore that, thankfully, needs to be done only periodically. “Unless you have pets or small children who leave smudges, you may not need to clean the inside of the window,” says Donna Smallin Kuper, a certified housecleaning technician and small-space expert. (Pro tip: You can hire someone to do this for you for around $100.) Rid yourself of dust bunnies. Roll up your area rugs and vacuum underneath them. Pull out your stove and refrigerator and do the same. It’s also a good idea to gently vacuum your refrigerator coils, which will keep the fridge running properly. Be sure to unplug the fridge before doing this, and consult your user manual to find the location of the coils. Fix up your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The daylight savings time change is a good reminder to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. But while you’re at it, remove and wipe the detector cover with a damp cloth, then vacuum the interior to remove any dust particles, says Smallin Kuper. Check your dryer vents too, to make sure they are lint-free. Swap out your winter bedding. Remove your winter quilts and sheets and replace them with lighter-weight bedding. “Always launder these items before storing,” advises Smallin Kuper, adding that it helps keep moths at bay. Do a big dust. Working from high to low, start by wiping down ceiling fans and the tops of bookcases and other furniture with a duster that has an extending pole. Gently clean the inside of light fixtures and wipe down (cool) light bulbs to remove grime. Finally, dust baseboards and windowsills with a slightly damp microfiber cloth. Deep-clean carpets and rugs. If you haven’t done this before, it’s a sound idea to start now. “Many carpet manufacturers will void the warranty on carpets if they’re not professionally cleaned at least once every 12 to 18 months,” says Smallin Kuper. Get rid of stuff. Start with the obvious places, like your closet or junk drawer, but don’t skip the often-forgotten ones, like your bathroom and pantry. Go through your medicine cabinet and toss expired medications. Open up your cosmetic bag (or drawer) and throw out anything that looks a little grungy, and if you haven’t changed your toothbrush in a few months, swap it out for a new one. Toss anything in your pantry that’s expired and give your utensil drawer a once-over — are the knives too worn or in need of a little sharpening? Is there anything there that should be tossed? Deep-clean your kitchen appliances. Wipe down the door of your stove, dishwasher, and fridge with warm, soapy water. Turn on the self-clean cycle in your oven and then tackle the inside of your dishwasher with a toothbrush and hot, soapy water, making sure to clean the rubber seal inside the door. Wipe away any debris with a leftover sponge, put a cup full of white vinegar on the top rack, and run a full cycle. When the cycle is done, wipe the inside of the dishwasher with a soft cloth. Originally published March 8, 2016. Updated February 15, 2018. What other cleaning practices do you make time for after the daylight savings time change? Let us know in the comments below! We can help with your home search. Receive weekly news, advice, listings, and neighborhood info by email. Sign Me Up Want to Share a Comment? (4) Michelle Hainer Michelle Hainer is a freelance writer, editor, and blogger whose work has appeared in Country Living, InStyle, People, Teen People, and The Washington Post. Read about her family’s adventures in eating locally and seasonally on her blog, Made By Michelle. DIY MORE ABOUT: Decluttering, DIY, Organizing Related articles and tips VIDEO: No Chimney? No Problem! Read More 13 Awesomely Festive Hacks for the Perfect Holiday Bash Read More Tour a Texas Home Straight Out of a Dystopian Novel Read More The No-Cost, Totally Free Home Makeover Read More Share your comments Real Estate 101 Buying Selling Renting House Hunting Money Matters Financial Tips Mortgages & Loans Taxes Life at Home Remodel & Renovate Moving Design & Decorate Eye Candy DIY Celebrity Actors & Actresses Musicians Athletes Exec Crowd Find Homes on the Go Learn More Trulia’s top-rated mobile app shows homes for sale near you—anytime, anywhere. About Trulia About Zillow Group Careers Investor Relations Advertising Terms Privacy Terms of Use Listing Quality Policy Subscription Terms Ad Choices Copyright © 2017 Trulia, Inc. All rights reserved. Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity. Have a Question? Visit our Help Center to find the answer. Daylight Savings Is the Perfect Time For House Maintenance By Michelle Hainer | Feb 15, 2018 5:03PM It’s almost time to move the clocks ahead an hour. But that’s not the only thing you should be doing on March 11, 2018. Daylight savings time rolls around twice a year for most of the country, and while it may moderately disrupt your sleep schedule for a few days, the event is an excellent reminder to tackle those infrequent chores. Even if you own a piece of Phoenix, AZ, real estate (where the daylight savings time change doesn’t exist), the days are slowly getting longer from now until the summer solstice, leaving you plenty of time to check off a few extra tasks. Daylight Savings is a great time to… Clean your windows. It’s an arduous chore that, thankfully, needs to be done only periodically. “Unless you have pets or small children who leave smudges, you may not need to clean the inside of the window,” says Donna Smallin Kuper, a certified housecleaning technician and small-space expert. (Pro tip: You can hire someone to do this for you for around $100.) Rid yourself of dust bunnies. Roll up your area rugs and vacuum underneath them. Pull out your stove and refrigerator and do the same. It’s also a good idea to gently vacuum your refrigerator coils, which will keep the fridge running properly. Be sure to unplug the fridge before doing this, and consult your user manual to find the location of the coils. Fix up your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The daylight savings time change is a good reminder to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. But while you’re at it, remove and wipe the detector cover with a damp cloth, then vacuum the interior to remove any dust particles, says Smallin Kuper. Check your dryer vents too, to make sure they are lint-free. Swap out your winter bedding. Remove your winter quilts and sheets and replace them with lighter-weight bedding. “Always launder these items before storing,” advises Smallin Kuper, adding that it helps keep moths at bay. Do a big dust. Working from high to low, start by wiping down ceiling fans and the tops of bookcases and other furniture with a duster that has an extending pole. Gently clean the inside of light fixtures and wipe down (cool) light bulbs to remove grime. Finally, dust baseboards and windowsills with a slightly damp microfiber cloth. Deep-clean carpets and rugs. If you haven’t done this before, it’s a sound idea to start now. “Many carpet manufacturers will void the warranty on carpets if they’re not professionally cleaned at least once every 12 to 18 months,” says Smallin Kuper. Get rid of stuff. Start with the obvious places, like your closet or junk drawer, but don’t skip the often-forgotten ones, like your bathroom and pantry. Go through your medicine cabinet and toss expired medications. Open up your cosmetic bag (or drawer) and throw out anything that looks a little grungy, and if you haven’t changed your toothbrush in a few months, swap it out for a new one. Toss anything in your pantry that’s expired and give your utensil drawer a once-over — are the knives too worn or in need of a little sharpening? Is there anything there that should be tossed? Deep-clean your kitchen appliances. Wipe down the door of your stove, dishwasher, and fridge with warm, soapy water. Turn on the self-clean cycle in your oven and then tackle the inside of your dishwasher with a toothbrush and hot, soapy water, making sure to clean the rubber seal inside the door. Wipe away any debris with a leftover sponge, put a cup full of white vinegar on the top rack, and run a full cycle. When the cycle is done, wipe the inside of the dishwasher with a soft cloth. Originally published March 8, 2016. Updated February 15, 2018. What other cleaning practices do you make time for after the daylight savings time change? Let us know in the comments below! We can help with your home search. Receive weekly news, advice, listings, and neighborhood info by email. Sign Me Up Want to Share a Comment? (4) Michelle Hainer Michelle Hainer is a freelance writer, editor, and blogger whose work has appeared in Country Living, InStyle, People, Teen People, and The Washington Post. Read about her family’s adventures in eating locally and seasonally on her blog, Made By Michelle. DIY MORE ABOUT: Decluttering, DIY, Organizing Related articles and tips VIDEO: No Chimney? No Problem! Read More 13 Awesomely Festive Hacks for the Perfect Holiday Bash Read More Tour a Texas Home Straight Out of a Dystopian Novel Read More Daylight Savings Is the Perfect Time For House Maintenance By Michelle Hainer | Feb 15, 2018 5:03PM It’s almost time to move the clocks ahead an hour. But that’s not the only thing you should be doing on March 11, 2018. Daylight savings time rolls around twice a year for most of the country, and while it may moderately disrupt your sleep schedule for a few days, the event is an excellent reminder to tackle those infrequent chores. Even if you own a piece of Phoenix, AZ, real estate (where the daylight savings time change doesn’t exist), the days are slowly getting longer from now until the summer solstice, leaving you plenty of time to check off a few extra tasks. Daylight Savings is a great time to… Clean your windows. It’s an arduous chore that, thankfully, needs to be done only periodically. “Unless you have pets or small children who leave smudges, you may not need to clean the inside of the window,” says Donna Smallin Kuper, a certified housecleaning technician and small-space expert. (Pro tip: You can hire someone to do this for you for around $100.) Rid yourself of dust bunnies. Roll up your area rugs and vacuum underneath them. Pull out your stove and refrigerator and do the same. It’s also a good idea to gently vacuum your refrigerator coils, which will keep the fridge running properly. Be sure to unplug the fridge before doing this, and consult your user manual to find the location of the coils. Fix up your smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. The daylight savings time change is a good reminder to change the batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. But while you’re at it, remove and wipe the detector cover with a damp cloth, then vacuum the interior to remove any dust particles, says Smallin Kuper. Check your dryer vents too, to make sure they are lint-free. Swap out your winter bedding. Remove your winter quilts and sheets and replace them with lighter-weight bedding. “Always launder these items before storing,” advises Smallin Kuper, adding that it helps keep moths at bay. Do a big dust. Working from high to low, start by wiping down ceiling fans and the tops of bookcases and other furniture with a duster that has an extending pole. Gently clean the inside of light fixtures and wipe down (cool) light bulbs to remove grime. Finally, dust baseboards and windowsills with a slightly damp microfiber cloth. Deep-clean carpets and rugs. If you haven’t done this before, it’s a sound idea to start now. “Many carpet manufacturers will void the warranty on carpets if they’re not professionally cleaned at least once every 12 to 18 months,” says Smallin Kuper. Get rid of stuff. Start with the obvious places, like your closet or junk drawer, but don’t skip the often-forgotten ones, like your bathroom and pantry. Go through your medicine cabinet and toss expired medications. Open up your cosmetic bag (or drawer) and throw out anything that looks a little grungy, and if you haven’t changed your toothbrush in a few months, swap it out for a new one. Toss anything in your pantry that’s expired and give your utensil drawer a once-over — are the knives too worn or in need of a little sharpening? Is there anything there that should be tossed? Deep-clean your kitchen appliances. Wipe down the door of your stove, dishwasher, and fridge with warm, soapy water. Turn on the self-clean cycle in your oven and then tackle the inside of your dishwasher with a toothbrush and hot, soapy water, making sure to clean the rubber seal inside the door. Wipe away any debris with a leftover sponge, put a cup full of white vinegar on the top rack, and run a full cycle. When the cycle is done, wipe the inside of the dishwasher with a soft cloth. Originally published March 8, 2016. Updated February 15, 2018. What other cleaning practices do you make time for after the daylight savings time change? Let us know in the comments below! We can help with your home search. Receive weekly news, advice, listings, and neighborhood info by email. Sign Me Up Want to Share a Comment? (4) Michelle Hainer Michelle Hainer is a freelance writer, editor, and blogger whose work has appeared in Country Living, InStyle, People, Teen People, and The Washington Post. Read about her family’s adventures in eating locally and seasonally on her blog, Made By Michelle. DIY MORE ABOUT: Decluttering, DIY, Organizing Related articles and tips VIDEO: No Chimney? No Problem! Read More 13 Awesomely Festive Hacks for the Perfect Holiday Bash Read More Tour a Texas Home Straight Out of a Dystopian Novel Read More

8 Creative Ways With Closets

Don’t Pack These! 11 Often-Forgotten Essentials You’ll Need on Moving Day

phone-chargers-move

Feb 20, 2018

You made it! The big move went smoothly and here you are, waking up for the first time in your new house. You toss off the covers and head downstairs to start brewing some coffee—only to realize the Keurig is nowhere to be found.

What started as a memorable morning soon turns into a scene you’d rather forget: tearing through box after box with no luck before you’re forced out into the world, uncaffeinated, in search of the closest place to get your fix

“I remember one couple who got into a really big fight the morning after their move because one of them wanted cereal and the other had packed away all the spoons,” says Christine Daves, a professional organizer and owner of Think Organized.

The good news is that with a little planning, postmove scenes like this can be easily avoided. We got the dish from the pros about the essential items you shouldn’t pack on moving day—and there are a couple of surprises.

1. Toiletries and medications

“I always tell clients to pack a suitcase like you’re going out of town for two days, and longer if the move is cross-country,” Daves says. “Your toothbrush might be [in a box] in the garage and your PJs might be in the kitchen. It’s just easier if everything you need is in one place—your suitcase.”

Make sure you also include a generous supply of toilet paper and hand soap so you aren’t caught off guard.

And don’t forget to toss any medications or supplements in your overnight bag.

“Prescriptions are a really big one,” notes Branden Hedberg of Hedberg Moving Solutions, in New Brighton, MN.

2. Important documents

Make sure you keep at least one form of identification on you during the move, especially if you’re renting a moving truck or anything else that’s going to require an ID.

Also, make sure you have any necessary documents—for both your new and old places—accessible at all times, Hedberg suggests.

3. Anything valuable

In the same vein, it’s best to keep anything of importance or value out of moving boxes and off the truck. Money, jewelry, or small family heirlooms can mysteriously disappear between point A and point B.

Keep them with you, or put them in a safe deposit box. (If you’re moving across town, you may want to get a new safe deposit box and relocate your treasures there before you move.)

4. Basic cleaning supplies

The house you move into should (hopefully) be cleaned before you arrive. But movers will be traipsing in and out of your house all day, and that will inevitably create a bit of mess.

If you keep a vacuum—or even just a broom and a dustpan—on hand, you can sweep everything up on moving day and won’t have to worry about waking up to a mess. Plus, isn’t starting with a clean slate what moving’s all about?

5. A shower curtain

This one’s remarkably easy to forget and pack away: If the showers in your new home aren’t enclosed with glass doors, make sure to keep a shower curtain with hooks—or at least a liner—handy for those first couple of nights. Keep towels out of the moving boxes, too—or be darned sure you know where they are.

6. Comforting items for the little ones

That means favorite stuffed animals and any blanket or pillow your kids are particularly attached to. It’ll make the first night in an unfamiliar place a lot less scary, Daves says.

7. A utility knife and a marker

Sounds strangely specific, right? Well, these two items are going to make unpacking feel like a breeze.

“If you’re going to dive into unpacking right away, you’ll want a utility knife out—a couple of them, even, because you’ll set them down and get distracted,” Daves says.

She also likes to keep a marker handy to mark boxes that have been unpacked. Her method: Fill up empty boxes with the disposable moving supplies (e.g., bubble wrap) and mark them with a big X once they’re ready to be taken out to the trash or for recycling.

8. Phone and laptop chargers

We don’t think you’d actually put these in a moving box. But no one wants that “oh crap” moment when your phone or laptop is dead and you have no idea where you put the charger. Make sure you (and your kids) know where these sanity-saving items are before you make the move.

9. Paper plates and disposable cutlery

There are only so many nights you can eat pizza while hovering over the box, or Chinese food straight from the containers. Don’t be the couple who fight; have disposable plates, cups, cutlery, and paper towels on hand from the get-go.

If you’re especially efficient and manage to unpack your dishware on Day 1, make sure you have dish soap and sponges on hand to clean them.

10. Everything your pet needs

Imagine clipping on your dog’s leash and getting Rover excited for his afternoon walk only to realize that you have absolutely no idea where the doggie bags are. Don’t risk being the new neighbor who doesn’t pick up after their pup—leave the doggie bags out of the moving boxes. (Make sure you don’t pack his food and water bowls, either).

11. A corkscrew

Trust us: At the end of moving day, you’ll want this handy.

Leslie Sells Houses

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The 5 Best Things to Do When You Move into Your New Home

Natural scented items for the home

Yes, a more homey home starts with a new toilet seat.

Moving into your dream home can be a daunting task. Between unpacking, cleaning, and trying to find that stray roll of toilet paper, it may feel like you’ve lost your mind in a sea of Bubble Wrap.

That’s why I wanted to share with you five simple things that you should do during the first month in your new home. These may feel like back-burner tasks, but really, they’ll help you sleep better at night and make your new place feel less like a house and more like your home.

When we moved into our dream house, we were tired, overwhelmed, and couldn’t remember where we put the sippy cups for our 10-month-old son. Plus, we had no idea what to do first! Of course, we cleaned and unpacked, but what next?

This handful of to-dos walks you through each of those tasks and why you should tackle them first and foremost.

Let’s get to it!

#1 Lock It Up

Security is the No. 1 concern for most people in a new environment. You can easily switch out your locks and deadbolts to your new home to protect your valuables and your family.

Woman securing a front door lockImage: Bower Power

Now’s the time to consider the lockset finish, and the options are endless. When it comes to exterior locks, make sure you choose something that looks timeless and can be cleaned easily.

A new security system is also a good idea. The options for this are endless as well. Systems with online monitoring, smartphone compatibility, thermostat control, and even video monitors for the interior including the baby nursery are super helpful. Even if that room is empty now, it might not be in the future – so go ahead and secure it!

#2 Remove Toilet Seats

Some folks may think it’s unnecessary to replace toilet seats, but my point here is to simply remove them. By removing your toilet seats, you can really deep clean under the bolts and hinges where the “yucks” like to hide. Your goal is to make sure your royal throne is YOU-worthy.

Woman standing in front of toilet seats on a wallImage: Bower Power

You can reinstall your existing seat or opt to shop for a new one. New versions with night-lights, padding, or even child-sized attachments are available. Either way, you’ll know your favorite seat in the house is ready for your entire family.

#3 Improve Your Home’s Air

Changing an air filter is a three-minute task, and it should be done right after moving into a new home – even if the previous owners swear the chore was just done. Changing out a filter can help improve the performance of your air conditioning and furnace and help with any allergens in the home.

Man checking air filterImage: Bower Power

This inexpensive fix can also save you money! The U.S. Department of Energy says that replacing your dirty air filter with a new one can lower your A/C’s energy consumption by 5 percent to 10 percent.

It’s a good idea to write the replacement date directly on the filter when you put it in so you can be sure you know how long it’s been since the last change.

Also, take the time to test and change out batteries in all your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors. These are often tested during inspections, but the batteries can die and tampered-with units aren’t uncommon, especially if a house was left vacant.

Related: How to Keep Your Heating and Cooling System in Top Shape

#4  Paint Your Front Door

Painting your front door (or freshening it up with a coat of oil if it’s wood) can show your new neighbors that you’ve arrived on the block and are investing in your home. This simple task is so easy!

Woman painting her front door greenImage: Bower Power

After you do proper prep work, which includes sanding the surface, make sure you pick an exterior-grade paint and use a high-quality bristle brush to give it multiple thin coats for the best coverage. It’s a great time to show off your personal style, and these days any color goes!

Every day you walk in through your newly made-over door, you’ll feel welcomed into your new home and inspired to keep creating a space you love.

#5 Choose Your Signature Scent

Every house has a smell. You know what I’m talking about. It’s that “other people smell” that’s definitely not your own particular brand of aroma. Even if the smell isn’t bad, it just isn’t yours, and that makes you feel like an intruder in someone else’s space. Make your dream home even more dreamy by filling it with your signature scent.

Don’t have a signature scent? Check out a candle store or the air-freshener aisle to peruse the options, and then regularly use your favorite in your new home. My favorite is a lemon-vanilla-rosemary mix that I let simmer all day on the stove; it fills every room of the house.

In homes that have particularly distressing “stanks,” try getting the carpets cleaned before moving in the furniture. It can eliminate the smell as well as remove allergens, dirt, and stains.

Leslie Sells Houses

Related:  From Carpets to Critters, Most Move-In Must Dos

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Effective Improvements for a Faster Sale

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You have decided to sell your home, and you are eager to sell it ASAP! Here are the ways to efficiently and effectively improve your home for a speedy sale.

You have decided to sell your home, and you are eager to sell it ASAP!  You need to move or want those proceeds immediately, but how? Let’s go through the best ways to efficiently and effectively improve your home for a speedy sale.

First, curbside appeal.  This is the first thing every potential buyer sees so make it stand out!  Some suggestions:

  • Hire a gardener to clean and spruce up the entrance
  • Remove superfluous items from the front of your home, i.e. garbage cans, strollers, etc.
  • Put a fresh coat of paint on your home’s exterior

Second, this is the time to clean and eliminate all clutter inside your home.  Here’s how:

  • Give away extra toys, clothes, and anything else that makes it look crowded or disorganized
  • Organize the kitchen countertops and closets
  • Place bulky items in storage

Third, landscaping matters.  A large yard cannot shine if the plants, grass and trees are in bad shape.  Try the following ideas:

  • Artificial grass-this always looks amazing and eliminates the need for maintenance
  • Tie orchids around the trees, plant fresh flowers and maintain the grass and trees

Fourth, look under the hood.  Make the inside of your home look as good as possible.

  •  This is the time to do some of the minor repairs you have been putting off.  This will make your home look better and may eliminate certain issues during the Inspection Period.
  •  Yes, it seems expensive or time-consuming.  However, if you hire a professional company, this can truly make the difference and get you more money in less time.

Finally, hire a professional, licensed realtor.  Leslie Sells Houses A realtor with experience and expertise can help sell your home quickly for the best price.

Best of luck!

Your local  Realtor Leslie Sells Houses

 

 

How to Make Space for a New Pet at Home

What you post online could put you at risk.

Image result for pictures of posting online

Here are 4 Ways to Stay Safe.

What you post online could put you at risk. Here are 4 Ways to Stay Safe.

Your safety with regards to Technology is our concern. And at times we write about potential threats and provide you with resources, so you can stay safe. For this reason, today we write about the unpleasant side of geotagging. While geotagging can be fun and convenient, we believe it’s important to be aware of how geotagging works. Because although we may like the benefits and convenience of it, there are also dangers that come with it.

 

Geotagging

 

In layman’s terms, Geotagging is when your geographical location is tagged to something digital, such as a post, photo or video.

  • Sometimes geotagging is done automatically for us, such as when you take a picture with your smartphone. You don’t see it, but your location is automatically recorded in the meta-data of the photo.
  • Sometimes we geotag ourselves on our social media channels. Social networks have geotagging features built in (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat). Do you ‘check-in’ or ‘add location’ to your social media post when you arrive at a restaurant? A concert? The airport?  If you have, then you’ve geotagged your location.
  • Sometimes we geotag ourselves on apps, such as when we share our ‘run’ or ‘bike’ trail online.

 

The danger of ‘checking in’ or ‘adding location.’

 

Depending on your online privacy settings – and your friends’!– your geographical information can be seen online not just by friends and family you trust, but it could potentially be seen by strangers with criminal intentions.

People who have malicious intentions will exploit to their advantage anything you give them.  When you geotag yourself to a location and you– or your friends– share your location with the public, criminals can learn your patterns. They call it Cybercasing.

Cybercasing refers to how geotagged text, photos and videos can be used by criminals and other negatively motivated 3rd parties.” Burglary, Identity Theft and Cyberstalking are only a few of the possible crimes you could be a victim of.

Thieves want to know when you are out of the house and for how long are you out of the house. If you “check-in” at the same coffee shop or gym at the same time on specific days, someone could determine your routine and exploit that information to their advantage.

Pedophiles stalking children want to see photos of your kids and want to know what school they go to, what parks they frequent, and what interests they have.

 

Photos & Videos

 

However, even if you don’t share your location – if you only share a photo – criminals can find your location with the photo you shared.

Aside from any visible landmarks, criminals can extract the location information from the picture you posted online. If you shared a photo you took in your home, they could extract what valuables you own (from the photo) and your location (from the meta-data).

This is relevant as well for the photos and videos of the homes you list for sale in YouTube. Does the video of the house show any valuables inside? Have you put the address of the house as well? You could have just put your client at risk!

What you post may be innocent – what criminals see is opportunity. For example,

  • Posting “I’m on Vacation” = no one is at the house
  • Posting “Home alone and bored” = I’m vulnerable
  • Photos of your home = look at my valuables

 

What you can do

 

1.       Learn more about the Privacy Settings of the Social Media channels and exercise apps you use.

 

2.       Consider turning off location services on some location sharing apps

  • Turn ‘off’ location sharing on the apps you think might pose a safety risk.
  • Keep ‘on’ the ones that are beneficial to keep – such as ‘Find My iPhone’ or ‘Find Friends’

 

3.      Don’t post your photos online or if you do, remove geotags from your digital photos

  • On our iPhone: Go to Settings > Privacy>Location Services> locate the name of the app or the Camera and change it from the “ON” position to the “OFF” position.

 

4.      Continue educating yourself on this topic.  Call your Tech Helpline for advice.

Leslie Sells Houses

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